Phoneography Challenge: A Black and White Tale of Love

He was there when she woke up. She lifted her head and blinked at the stranger in surprise. “Are you all right?” the man asked, his eyes fixed on her.

Dionysus and Adriadne, MFA, Boston

Dionysus and Adriadne, MFA, Boston

She nodded but as she sat up she remembered it all–the ship, the long voyage, Theseus.  He was a blow to her chest, making it difficult to breathe. She was a fool to love him, to marry him.  But he was a king, dazzling her with his power, his wealth.  Charming her with his talk of love.   So, she had agreed to marry him.  And she loved him even as he changed.  Making her cry.  Wounding her with his accusations, his coldness, his demands.  But then, in unexpected moments, he’d surprise her with kisses and tenderness, like in the beginning.   In his arms, she believed him.  And she forgave him over and over.

Her loyalty and love were absolute–until the very end.  Just yesterday, even as his men tied her arms and legs, she was sure it was a mistake.  “Does Theseus know about this?” she had demanded, but the men had laughed as they hauled her off the boat and rowed her to the shore in the distance.  Then, they dumped her in a heap on the sand.  As Theseus and his crew sailed away, she had cried herself to sleep.  And now, as the morning sun sparkled off the sand and water of this strange island, she sat up and rubbed her eyes, staring at the handsome man before her, struggling to believe he was real.   But he spoke again.  His name was Dionysis and this island–Naxos–was his.

She struggled to her feet, swaying.

“Are you sure you’re all right?” he said with concern. “You look very pale.” He touched her shoulder.

She hesitated, taking a measure of him–his curls, his lips, his smile so sincere and so caring.  But could she trust him?

“What happened?” he asked again with concern and tenderness and so she told him, the words spilling like sand through her fingers.   And afterwards, he extended a cup towards her.  “Here take a sip.   My wine will bring back your strength.  You need to rest and get well again.  My house is just beyond the beach. You can stay as long as you like. But I must warn you. I spoil all my guests, especially women as lovely as you.”

His words were a balm, bringing a rush of warmth into her stiff and bruised limbs.   And despite the warning circling through her head, she extended her hand, taking the cup from him.

This tale of love is immortalized in this statue from the collection of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.  I hope you enjoy it!

To learn more about Sally’s phoneography challenge, click the link below:

http://lensandpensbysally.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/phoneography-challenge-the-phone-as-your-lens-black-and-white-and-what-is-a-photograph/

To see other entries for this week’s black and white challenge, click the links below:

http://sustainabilitea.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/phoneography-challenge-black-and-white-3/

http://pictograf.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/iphoneography-black-and-white-2/

http://weliveinaflat.com/blog/panorama-shot-using-galaxy-note-3/

http://completelydisappear.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/the-beginning-of-the-end/

http://streetsofsfphotos.com/2014/02/17/paints-in-black-white-and-color/

http://livingwithmyancestors.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/phoneography-challenge-black-white-2/

About these ads

22 thoughts on “Phoneography Challenge: A Black and White Tale of Love

  1. Wonderful depiction of the sculptures, especially that you captured the soft effects of the marble. Beautiful. Happy Phoneography MNonday.

    • Thanks, Sally! I took several shots, but this one–from below–seemed to bring out the texture of the marble the best. I’m so glad you think it worked! I appreciate the feedback.

  2. Beautiful sharp contrast of black and white.

  3. The low angle catches the expressions. Very cool ^__^

  4. Why thanks, Welive! It did seem more interesting to me too. Thanks for your thoughts!

  5. You caught the shadows so well and they soften the photo nicely.

    janet

  6. Beautiful capture of the sculpture! And she forgave him over and over, so very sad…

  7. Hi Amy! Thanks for your thoughts! I must admit the forgiveness part is my interpretation of the Greek myth, but given that she pairs up with Bacchus/Dionysis, it seemed right!

  8. nicely captured B&W sculpture

  9. The light is extremely well accomplished. I like the contrast very much.

  10. You did a magnificent job of photographing the marble. The angle is great! Ah, the poor confused woman just wanting to be loved…

  11. Thanks so much! It’s interesting how expressive the faces are from that angle. And yes…that’s my interpretation of poor Adriadne…going from one bad relationship to the next! I appreciate your thoughts!

  12. Well written. Totally enjoyed your awesome writing and skills as a writer.

  13. Wow, Drew. Thanks so much! I’m glad you enjoyed it.

Don't Be Shy! Comments, please!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s