Weekly Photo Challenge: Escape

Don’t get me wrong. I love to escape to a new place and explore the food, the sights, and the culture of another land.

Wind Star

On this trip, we sailed from Rome to Barcelona on the Wind Star–a breathtakingly beautiful sailing ship with decks made of teak wood and gracious staff that wanted to indulge us–with food, drink, and creature comforts.

Jiuwn, Wind Star

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We explored glittery Monaco, climbing the steep, winding streets.  In Elba, we walked along the sandy beaches.

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And visited the mansion where Napoleon was exiled–
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But honestly, escape means more to me than travel.  In fact, this is not my preferred method of escape. I hear your cries of protest. “What? Are you crazy? This is the perfect escape!”  I must disagree.  For me, the ideal escape is into the world of imagination–

Walking into the movie theater and sinking into the velvet seats, watching a story unfold.  Or, devouring books, swallowing them whole, and in the process entering the minds and hearts of the characters. (For a while as a teenager, I only read books about the sailors, the sea and their superstitions–like the figure head at the prow.  It is not simply an ornament.  Its purpose is to  ward off evil and appease the fickle gods of the sea who apparently love voluptuous women.)

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Or, picking up a camera and capturing the essence of a moment, or a place, or a particular slant of light.  Or, listening to music, which triggers an emotional response in the brain and can link the present to a past memory or emotion.  What can be better than that?

Art is enduring.  It transcends the ordinary.  It can uplift our spirits and link us to the eternal.  It can mitigate pain and suffering and transport us to another place.  For all these reasons, it is the perfect escape.

This statue erected in the lobby of a municipal building in Amsterdam reminds us of that fact.

The musician-honoring the spirit of those Jewish artists who continued to create even within the prison camps during World War II

Honoring the creative spirit of Jewish artists who played even within the prison camps during World War II

It honors the Jewish artists who continued to play and create new works even within the walls of prison camps during World War II.  Their art endures, just as all art.  It was an escape from the harsh realities of prejudice and war, but it was also a testament to the power the creative human spirit.

Do you agree?

Other Interpretations of this week’s theme:

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19 replies »

  1. “Art is enduring. It transcends the ordinary. It can uplift our spirits and link us to the eternal. It can mitigate pain and suffering and transport us to another place. For all these reasons, it is the perfect escape.”

    I could not have said it better. Art certainly feeds the spirit. It makes all of us more human.

    Like

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