Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge: Macro in the Museum

One of the joys of finishing a huge project at work is that I can join Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge this week.   For this macro challenge, I selected a shot of a beautiful wooden reliquary bust of Saint Margaret by the Dutch sculptor Nicolaus Gerhaert von Leyden on display at the Art Institute of Chicago.  Two of the known issues of shooting in a museum gallery are compensating for reflections and uneven lighting.  As you can see in the shot below, taken through a glass case, there are many distracting elements.

Shot #1.  St. Margaret.  Right View. Original

Princess Bride. Original Shot. Samsung Galaxy S 4

Saint Margaret. Original Shot. Samsung Galaxy S 4

Shot #2.  St. Margaret.  Right View.  Poster Effects.

I brought the image, shot with my Samsung Galaxy, into Photoshop and used the clone stamp and dodging and burning tools to remove the reflections, and deepen the color.  As a final step, I applied the poster effects filter, which highlights the wood grain and texture.

Princess Bridge with Poster Edges Effects. Shot with a Samsung Galaxy S 5.

Saint Margaret with Poster Edges Effects. Shot with a Samsung Galaxy S 5.

Shot 3:  St. Margaret.  Left View.  Original

Here’s another shot of the same sculpture from another angle.  Not surprisingly, the original shot has the same issues with reflections and lighting.

Original. Saint Margaret. Left View. Shot with a Samsung Galaxy S 5.

Original. Saint Margaret. Left View. Shot with a Samsung Galaxy S 5.

Shot #4.  St. Margaret.  Right View.  Texturizing Filter.

Using a similar technique, I brought the image into Photoshop, applied the dodge and burn tools, and used the clone stamp.  Then I applied a texturizer filter.

Saint Margaret. Shot with a Samsung Galaxy S5. Texturizer Filter.

Saint Margaret. Shot with a Samsung Galaxy S5. Texturizer Filter.

Of the two filter effects, do you prefer the more dramatic poster effects or the more subtle texturizing filter?   Is the shot more interesting with the woman in the background or do you prefer the one without her?

Little is known about the sculptor, Nicolaus Gerhaert.  But his work still seems fresh and original, even though it dates from the 15th Century.   The realism of the statue is striking–including the carefully observed details, such as St. Margaret’s braids and fingernails.

I hope you enjoyed my artistic experiment.  And have a great week, everyone!

To view other entries for this week’s challenge, click on the links below:

https://chasinglifeandfindingdreams.wordpress.com/2015/12/14/wildflower-surprises/

https://sustainabilitea.wordpress.com/2015/12/14/sally-ds-mobile-photography-challenge-macro-magical-milkweed

http://luciledegodoy.com/2015/12/14/sally-ds-mobile-photography-challenge-macro-5/

https://decocraftsdigicrafts.wordpress.com/2015/12/15/sally-ds-mobile-photography-challenge-frothy-impressions/

12 replies »

  1. Patti, delighted to have you join us. Your close ups help us appreciate the wooden textured carvings. I wasn’t sure of the materials at first glance. You clarified that for me. You’ve pointed out–and rightfully so–the difficulty of shooting inside a museum. You’ve certainly compensated for those conditions. They are clear and each has something else to divulge. Happy Photo Challenge.

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  2. Hi Sally. Thanks for the warm welcome back! So glad you thought the clarity was good. That’s another issue I didn’t mention when shooting through glass. The Samsung did a good job in terms of clarity. 🙂 Hope you have a great week.

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